Imlee Chutney (Tamarind)

…This recipe is basic, classic, and just the thing you need to keep those family traditions alive. I use imlee ki chutney all year round, but there’s something about the time of year when Ramadan is coming closer, and you just want those classic comfort foods to surround you as you fast the month away. Food has memories attached to them, which is why we make certain foods for certain holidays, and a good old imlee ki chutney is just what you need this Ramadan…

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Papri Chaat

Papri Chaat is, in my opinion, the king of chaats. Just the sight of it makes me happy. And honestly, what’s not to love? Chickpeas and potatoes drenched in spicy chutneys and a cooling yogurt sauce, topped with freshly ground cumin and crunchy papad. Sigh…

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Hari Chutney (Mint Chutney)

Chutneys have the power to make or break your food. I don’t mind buying ready made chutneys, but there are two that I make the effort to make, especially during Ramadan, because I like my version the best and also because they make me feel a little closer to home! They have such deep and concentrated flavors that a little goes a long way and there’s nothing like a well made chutney that instantly transports you back home. Hari Chutney, or mint chutney, is such a classic…

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Chicken with Almonds

This recipe is one that I have been after for many years. It was written in a cookbook, then ripped out and placed in another, then it was misplaced and lost forever…I vaguely remembered my mom making it, and with just half of the ingredients in mind, I began mixing and experimenting with sauces until I had my “Aha!” moment…This recipe is so simple to pull together, as all my recipes are, and I promise you, if you have all your ingredients out in front of you, this will come together in 15-20 minutes. That’s a weeknight meal miracle, isn’t it? So here’s it is, Chicken with Almonds, in all it’s glory. ..

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Orange Butter Cake

She would make it in the winter, when oranges were in season, bustling about her kitchen, using a tea cup as her only measuring tool. She would fill it up with as much fresh Malai (fresh cream) as the milk could conjour up, then add oil to fill the cup to the brim. She’d use her mini chopper to crush up the large granules of sugar, native to Pakistan, then crack in the eggs, one at at time. She’d add the flour and then tell me my nana (maternal grandfather) had brought some fresh oranges that morning, so she would add some juice to the batter and it would taste really good. The cake would come out just as the chai was brewed, in those small metal bowls everyone used to freeze ice in. I was the fat kid so I ate half the cake just like that, and I wouldn’t even feel bad about it…

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